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Rubinstein: Recorded Live in the Netherlands in 1963

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Rubinstein: Recorded Live in the Netherlands in 1963

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Arthur Rubinstein never played in Germany after 1914, but in 1963 he gave a concert in Holland, across the border, so Germans could come to it. His daughter said her dad had been unnerved enough by the situation that he worried about his technique and wasn't sure whether to attempt the repeat in the finale of the "Appassionata." He must have relaxed, though, because the most moving thing about this album is how you can hear the old man having fun. In Chopin's First Ballade, albeit a piece he could play in his sleep, he is marvelously unhurried, luxuriating in the melodies. Attacking Schumann's "Carnaval," he gets reckless, missing notes, in the "March of the Davidsbund Against the Philistines." When he gets to the fork in road in the "Appassionata" finale, you cheer him on, hearing him take that repeat. It's explosive, like a young man's performance. And his simple take on Brahms' Intermezzo No. 2, Op. 117, under the circumstances, says more than words ever could about the universality of music. -- The Buffalo News, Mary Kunz Goldman, November 23, 2008

Rubinstein: Recorded Live in the Netherlands in 1963

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Saturday, November 20, 2021

A year since farmers first showed up at the gates of Delhi to protest against three new agriculture laws which were later put on hold by the Supreme Court, Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced Friday that the laws will be repealed and the process completed in the upcoming winter session of Parliament. In an address to the nation, the Prime Minister said: “While apologising to the countrymen, today I want to say sincerely that perhaps there must have been some deficiency in our penance that we could not explain the truth like the light of the lamp to the farmer brothers.” A look at why and how the government had pushed these laws, why it has now withdrawn them, and the implications of the move, politically and economically.